Excel Shortcut: Strikethrough Text Made Easy

Understanding Excel Strikethrough

Excel provides a variety of formatting options, including the ability to apply a strikethrough effect to text. This can be a useful tool for indicating completed tasks or marking items for deletion. In this section, we’ll take a closer look at how strikethrough works in Excel and explore some of the ways it can be used.

Strikethrough in Desktop vs Online Excel

Excel is available in both desktop and online versions, and the process for applying strikethrough can differ slightly between the two. In desktop Excel, users can apply strikethrough formatting using the following steps:

  1. Select the cell or cells containing the text you want to format.
  2. Right-click and select “Format Cells” from the context menu.
  3. In the Format Cells dialog box, select the Font tab.
  4. Check the box next to “Strikethrough” under Effects.
  5. Click OK to apply the formatting.

In Excel Online, the process is similar but with a few differences:

  1. Select the cell or cells containing the text you want to format.
  2. Click on the “Home” tab in the ribbon.
  3. Click on the “Font” dropdown and select “More Fonts” at the bottom of the list.
  4. In the Format Cells dialog box, select the Font tab.
  5. Check the box next to “Strikethrough” under Effects.
  6. Click OK to apply the formatting.

It’s worth noting that some versions of Excel may have slightly different menus or options, so users should refer to their specific version’s documentation for more information.

Overall, strikethrough can be a useful tool for formatting text in Excel, whether you’re marking completed tasks or indicating items for deletion. By understanding how to apply this formatting and the effects it can have, users can make their spreadsheets more organized and easier to read.

Keyboard Shortcuts for Strikethrough

Excel offers several keyboard shortcuts to help users quickly apply strikethrough formatting to text. These shortcuts can boost productivity and save time. Here are some of the most useful Excel keyboard shortcuts for strikethrough:

Shortcut Differences: Windows vs Mac

There are some differences in keyboard shortcuts between Windows and Mac versions of Excel. Here are the most commonly used shortcuts for each platform:

  • Windows: To apply strikethrough formatting, press Ctrl+5.
  • Mac: To apply strikethrough formatting, press Command+Shift+X.

Additional Excel Shortcuts

In addition to the keyboard shortcuts for strikethrough, there are several other Excel shortcuts that can help users be more productive. Here are a few examples:

  • Ctrl+S: Saves the current workbook.
  • Ctrl+Z: Undoes the last action.
  • Ctrl+A: Selects all cells in the current worksheet.
  • Ctrl+G: Displays the Go To dialog box, which allows users to navigate to a specific cell or range of cells.
  • Ctrl+Y: Redoes the last action.
  • Ctrl+B: Applies bold formatting to text.
  • Ctrl+I: Applies italic formatting to text.
  • Ctrl+U: Applies underline formatting to text.

Users can also customize the Quick Access Toolbar to include their most frequently used commands and shortcuts.

Overall, keyboard shortcuts can be a powerful tool for increasing productivity in Excel. By learning and utilizing these shortcuts, users can save time and navigate more efficiently.

Advanced Strikethrough Techniques

Excel offers a number of advanced techniques for strikethrough formatting that can help users save time and work more efficiently. Here are some of the most useful techniques:

  • Using the Ribbon: The quickest and easiest way to apply strikethrough formatting is to use the Ribbon. Simply select the cell or range of cells you want to format, click on the “Home” tab, and then click on the “Strikethrough” button in the “Font” group.

  • Using Conditional Formatting: If you want to apply strikethrough formatting to cells based on certain conditions, you can use conditional formatting. To do this, select the cells you want to format, click on the “Conditional Formatting” button in the “Styles” group, and then choose “New Rule”. From there, you can choose the conditions that will trigger the formatting and select the “Strikethrough” option.

  • Using VBA: For more advanced users, VBA can be a powerful tool for automating strikethrough formatting. You can create macros that apply strikethrough formatting to specific cells or ranges of cells, or even to partial text within a cell.

  • Removing Strikethrough Formatting: If you need to remove strikethrough formatting from cells, you can do so by selecting the cells you want to modify, clicking on the “Font” tab in the “Format Cells” dialog box, and then unchecking the “Strikethrough” option.

  • Copying and Pasting Formatting: If you have already formatted a cell or range of cells with strikethrough formatting and want to apply the same formatting to other cells, you can use the “Format Painter” button. Simply select the cell or range of cells with the formatting you want to copy, click on the “Format Painter” button in the “Clipboard” group, and then select the cells you want to apply the formatting to.

  • Using the Options Dialog Box: For even more control over strikethrough formatting, you can use the “Options” dialog box. This allows you to specify the exact type of strikethrough you want to use (single, double, or single accounting), as well as whether or not to include strikethrough formatting in copied values.

By mastering these advanced strikethrough techniques, users can work more efficiently and create more professional-looking spreadsheets.

Authors

  • Collin Bennett

    eagle-eyed fact-checker at the heart of every post's accuracy. In an age where information is abundant and mistakes are costly, Samuel stands as the gatekeeper of truth for all Excel-related content. His meticulous approach ensures that every formula, every function, and every data-driven insight is both precise and verifiable.

  • James Davis

    Tech geek, excel super-user, software guru, and your go-to guy for all things digital. James has spent over a decade diving deep into the latest software and gadgets, making tech jargon easy for the rest of us. When he's not geeking out over the newest release, he's probably hunting for some new Excel tips as James spent 7 years perfecting his excel skills!

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